Careers in Mining

Charles Chamirai Nyabeze

Charles Chamirai Nyabeze

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Vice President of Business Development and Commercialization
Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation

My career in mining started with me being a curious young man. From an early age, I developed an interest in how things work. I grew to realize that pretty much everything made by people on earth depends on mining, mining is the cornerstone of all other industries. Almost all the infrastructure around us is derived from mining.



Mining is a complex system of systems and has been liked to a multi-level chess game being played by many people at the same time. I decided on a mining career in 2012, twelve years after I had graduated with a MBA (2000) and a degree in Mining Engineering (1998). My reason for being in mining today is a realization of the linkage between mining, the standard of living, low carbon economy, climate change and the reduction of things like energy consumption, GHG emissions and mining’s overall environmental footprint. The future sustainable mining industry is critical to meet the metal and mineral demands of the planets growing population.

Mining matters to every single human being on earth. Mining is the key catalyst to build sustainable communities. Not a single community on earth today exists without the infrastructure enabled by the minerals and metals from mining. I work in the world of innovation and I love being knowledgeable of bleeding age technologies and sharing them with the world. I am excited at the prospect of working with innovators from other sectors that want to bring their solutions into the global mining sector. As an avid “Innovation Scout” I am excited at the developments in cross-sectoral learning and knowledge transfer platforms that are aimed at bringing the full force of the Canadian innovation ecosystem to address mining challenges. I love matchmaking innovation and challenges “Innovation-Match”.  I run the commercialization division at CEMI which is all about matchmaking innovators to end-users.

According to the labour market information from the Mining Industry Human Resource Council (MIHR), the mining industry offers over 120 different types of jobs that cover all disciplines of work.  This means there is literally a place for everyone in mining. Mining takes place in every country on earth and offers the possibility of travelling and experiencing many cultures. It would be a safe bet to say that people in the mining industry are amongst the most well-travelled and most globally connected people on the planet. If you follow my twitter feed via @charlesnyabeze or follow my LinkedIn postings, you will quickly realize that I am a mining innovation promoter.

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Lindsay Robertson

Lindsay Robertson

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Associate, Environment Manager
Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd.

I started out at university in a degree in environmental science, majoring in environmental chemistry. Throughout most of my undergrad I thought I would head into a career in agriculture, but my path changed in my fourth year. I took a job in the soils lab and at that time my professor was working on the Sudbury Area Risk Assessment (SARA) soils study. That sparked my interest and curiosity in looking at mining related impacts on soils. I moved back to Sudbury to complete my Master’s at Laurentian University (M.Sc.), and applied my knowledge in a consulting role after I graduated. The more I worked on projects related to the mining industry, the more I could see the potential to apply what I had studied to improving environmental management at mine sites, thus reducing the environment footprint. After 4 years of professional work experience and meeting the criteria, I successfully became a registered Professional Geoscientist (P.Geo.).

The environmental aspects of mining is still a relatively “young” field of study, and as an industry we are still learning and exploring ways to improve how we do things. I like being able to see the impact my job has on the remediation of existing mines and working to improve the environmental impact of new mines. Every day is different and being able to work on different types of project with experts in the industry, in different parts of the world keeps me engaged and constantly learning. As the mining industry evolves and advances, I have had the opportunity to work with universities on applied research related to the environmental impact of mines. I love that my role has been able to evolve and adapt along with this dynamic and innovative industry.

There is a great balance in the mining industry of the new and the familiar. You are able to learn skills that apply fairly consistently to a wide range of mining projects, but the industry also gives you a chance to tackle different challenges because in the end, no two projects are alike! It takes many disciplines coming together as a team to work in mining, and you learn more about your own discipline by working with others on how everything fits together.

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Suzanne Halet

Suzanne Halet

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Manager in Mines and Minerals Division
Ministry of Energy, Northern Development and Mines

I come from a family who has been immersed in this industry. Prospectors, developers, engineers and geologists. My great grandfather, J.P. Norrie was an engineer, but also a prospector and developer who took projects “from cloddy earth to glittering gold”. He discovered and opened mines in the Abitibi region of northwestern Quebec, including Perron, East Malartic and Malartic Goldfields. A favourite J.P. quote that I like to refer to is: “if you wait for the green light, you’ve waited too long”. When I was young, I remember my dad going away for a few weeks every summer to prospect and stake mining claims. I would ask him where he was going, but he would never tell me! He knew that another kid in my class had a father who was a prospector, and they competed with one another. The mystery and intrigue of mineral development has followed me throughout my career. My first job in this industry was as a summer student/field assistant with the Ontario Geological Survey in 2004 as part of the Lake Nipigon Geoscience Initiative. I spent the summer going on remote adventures with knowledgeable and experienced geologists. From there, I was hooked on exploration. Maybe it’s in the blood? 16 years later, a winding road of education and experience brought me to where I am today. I get to work with a team who conducts analysis and provides insight on Ontario’s mineral sector. We advocate and assist in the development of initiatives and policies that create an improved climate for investment in our province. My unit is also responsible for the coordination of the Mines and Mineral’s division’s promotional activities (such as Ontario’s presence at the PDAC).

It’s very fast paced and dynamic. No two days are the same. I have to keep my finger on the pulse of the sector every day. As soon as I wake up, I’m checking the news to get ahead of any potential requests that may come to my team. There is an economist, statistician, analyst as well as promotions staff on my team who are constantly exchanging information and data and the conversations we have are always interesting. It’s great to observe our industry at a macro scale, and it’s definitely a different view from working in a core shack.

It’s a cornerstone industry in Northern Ontario, a place where those who love the outdoors can thrive. Living and working in Sudbury provides an excellent balance. We have excellent cross-country ski trails in the middle of the city, and the lakes are great for swimming. Sudbury is a great example of the phenomenal changes we have seen in our industry, over time. I have worked as a regulator and have seen first hand the extremely innovative science and technology driving change in our industry. The exploration and mining techniques of the 21st century are truly fascinating.

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Jahanzeb Sohail

Jahanzeb Sohail

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Electrical Engineer in Training (EIT) – Product Development
Maestro Digital Mine

My career in mining was developed thanks to opportunities in Sudbury. Being a fresh

graduate and seeking a dynamic industry to apply my skills, mining was where I choose to start my career after talking to a few friends. They love the work they do, the people they've met and the technologies they see coming into the mining sector; all of which excited me for new opportunities to seek in such an industry. Being an electrical engineering graduate from Western University, I was interested in seeing what I could bring to this major industry that has its branches all over the world. Figuring out the nuances in mining took me a while, but once you see the big picture, you truly see the beauty and innovations behind all the infrastructure, processes and products & services. Everything around us from our modern world is mined from minerals, without which we would be stuck in the stone age!

My job focuses on air quality and the safety of miners in the work environment. This may sound simple, but requires an intricate solution to ensure workers remain safe while on-site and underground. Realizing the importance of my role motivates me to ensure the environments are safer, cleaner and more energy-efficient with the help of technology. As mining is an industry that has been around for a while, there are a lot of opportunities to apply new-age dynamic solutions to existing problems. The continuous innovation is an aspect of the job I love as it exposes me to new technologies created by extremely talented individuals. Another reason I love my job is because of the community and the brilliant individuals you get to meet and interact with over time.

  • Trains you to think critically and dynamically towards innovative solutions
  • A well paying industry with a lot of opportunities to grow your skills
  • Exposure to extremely talented individuals and growing companies
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